Outcome: Healthy Babies

Indicator:  Three-Risk-Factor Births

Significance of this indicator:

Research has associated pre-term births with maternal socio-demographic factors such as marital status, age and educational attainment. Specifically, unmarried women under 25 years of age with less than 12 years of education have an increased risk for pre-term delivery.

Premature babies are those born earlier than 37 weeks of pregnancy. According to the March of Dimes, premature babies are at increased risk for newborn health complications, such as breathing problems, and even death. Premature babies also face an increased risk of lasting disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, learning and behavioral problems, cerebral palsy, lung problems and vision and hearing loss.

How we are doing on this indicator:

2008-2010
The percent of babies born to unmarried women under 25 years of age with less than 12 years of education in Pueblo County has been approximately double the state figures from 2008 to 2010. Encouragingly, the rate of these three socio-demographic risk factors at birth has decreased in 2010 from the previous year for the county (14.1 percent to 12.1 percent) and has decreased since 2008 for the state (6.7 percent to 5.6 percent).

2011-2012
The percent of babies born to unmarried women under 25 years of age with less than 12 years of education continues to decrease for both Pueblo County and Colorado.  The most significant change was the difference in Pueblo's percentage rate from 2010 to 2011 (12.1% to 9.5%).

2013
The downward trend continued for Colorado as a whole (although at a smaller percentage), and Pueblo county's numbers increased back up to 9.7%, slightly higher than 2011 numbers. 
 

What the Data Tell Us

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Definition: Births to unmarried women under 25 years of age with less than 12 years education per 100 live births.

Data Source: Health Statistics Section, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Provided by the Colorado Children's Campaign and/or National KIDS Count Program.

Data Considerations: n/a